Huxelerate and WEART: key players in Venice with Human Virus

Huxelerate and WEART: key players in Venice with Human Virus

Huxelerate and WEART: key players in Venice with Human Virus

Huxelerate and WEART: key players in Venice with Human Virus

Huxelerate and WEART: key players in Venice with Human Virus

Huxelerate and WEART are two e-Novia Enterprises and protagonists of the Human Virus exhibition, currently on show at Palazzo Zaguri, in the heart of Venice. Organised by Venice Exhibition, the show explores the history of the deadliest viruses, from the plague to the new coronavirus, as well as the evolution of scientific discoveries that help us deal with them, with the goal of raising public awareness of the highly topical issue of prevention.

 

The exhibition takes visitors on an educational journey made up of testimonies, studies, discoveries and special in-depth sections. There are four main exhibition areas: Knowledge, Cure, Understanding and Change. The Knowledge area is home to the Huxelerate installation, whereas the WEART one can be found in the Change area.

 

The concept behind the first installation was born from a question: how can technology change the fate of humanity? Visitors are then immersed in an interactive experience: from the simulated contagion of an infection to the identification of a personalized therapy. This is precisely where Huxelerate comes into play, with its high-performance products capable of significantly reducing the processing time of infection data, helping to identify new prevention and treatment solutions.

 

The WEART installation then transports visitors into a full sensory immersion experience. The main theme is proximity: in the current historical period, WEART represents a crucial tool in bringing people closer together, breaking down the barriers of social distancing and conveying the warmth of emotions.

The entire exhibition attempts to give the phenomenon of epidemics as much scientific depth and place as possible. In the Cure area, for example, a real intensive care unit has been set up, complete with all the relevant instruments, from ventilators to defibrillators, a symbol of the emergency situation we’re currently living in.

 

Even the historical knowledge, in this exhibition journey, aims to involve visitors on an emotional level. The so-called Gallery of Pandemics offers hyper-realistic portraits, complete with medical cases, of patients from the past, including a Roman legionary of 164 AD who was struck by smallpox and the cardinal of Avignon who was sick with the plague in 1300. The Gallery also includes an AIDS patient, a tragic reminder of the 1980s.